1/48 Chance Vought F4U-1 Corsair (Late version)

HB80382

New product

1/48 plastic kit from Hobby Boss, to build the Chance Vought F4U-1 Corsair (Late version), with decals for two US Navy versions.

More details

Subject to availability at the supplier. Delivery scheduled between 4 and 28 business days.

By buying this product you can collect up to 36 loyalty points. Your cart will total 36 loyalty points that can be converted into a voucher of 0,36 €.


36,95 € Tax included

-12%

Before 41,99 €

0.85 kg
Delivery: 3 to 8 weeks

Add to wishlist

Data sheet

BrandHobby Boss
Reference80382
SortPlastic kit
Scale1:48
Motifsingle-seat fighter aircraft
Plastic parts+/- 190
Size213,5 X 260mm
DecalsUS Navy
Historical periodWWII
AttentionDo not include paint or glue ( sold separately )
ContentPlastic parts for 1 kit | decals sheet for 2 versions | Instructions
Year2015

More info

The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured by Vought, in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).

The Corsair was designed as a carrier-based aircraft. However its difficult carrier landing performance rendered the Corsair unsuitable for Navy use until the carrier landing issues were overcome when used by the British Fleet Air Arm. The Corsair thus came to and retained prominence in its area of greatest deployment: land based use by the U.S. Marines. The role of the dominant U.S. carrier based fighter in the second part of the war was thus filled by the Grumman F6F Hellcat, powered by the same Double Wasp engine first flown on the Corsair's first prototype in 1940. The Corsair served to a lesser degree in the U.S. Navy. As well as the U.S. and British use the Corsair was also used by the Royal New Zealand Air Force, the French Navy Aéronavale and other, smaller, air forces until the 1960s. Some Japanese pilots regarded it as the most formidable American fighter of World War II, and the U.S. Navy counted an 11:1 kill ratio with the F4U Corsair.

After the carrier landing issues had been tackled it quickly became the most capable carrier-based fighter-bomber of World War II. The Corsair served almost exclusively as a fighter-bomber throughout the Korean War and during the French colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria.

The F4U-5 is the last propeller-driven fighter of the US Navy to be produced. They are developed from the F4U-4, the prototype of the aircraft is a converted F4U-4(BuNo.27296). A series of lastest technologies were applied to the aircraft, and the first flight were taken on December 21, 1945.
The F4U-5 have the longest nose of all the Corsairs, the extend nose contains the 2300hp R-2800-32W engine and the automatically-adjusting turbo supercharger. The cockpit was redesigned,and also the canopy. The F4U-5's production was limited to 233 examples with the ending of the war.

The Corsair Mk.II is the British version of the F4U-1A, which incorporated a bulged canopy with only two frames, along with a simplified clear view windscreen. The seat of the pilot was also raised about 180mm, allowing the pilot better visibility over the long nose and greatly improving carier landings.
The main difference between the F4U-1A and the Mk.II are the wingtips, with the latter having shorter wingtips for their aircraft and escort carriers, which are relatively smaller than US carriers.
The Royal Navy received 510 Corsair Mk II's—one of the two British Corsairs to be used in combat, they served in both Europe and the Pacific.

The F4U-4 was the last variant to see action during World War II, deliveries to the U.S. Navy of the F4U-4 began late in 1944, and this version fully equipped naval squadrons four months before the end of hostilities. It had the 2,100 hp (1,600 kW) dual-stage-supercharged -18W engine. When the cylinders were injected with the water/alcohol mixture, power was boosted to 2,450 hp (1,830 kW). The aircraft required an air scoop under the nose and the unarmored wing fuel tanks of 62 gal (234 l) capacities were removed for better maneuverability at the expense of maximum range. The propeller was changed to a four blade type. Maximum speed was increased to 448 miles per hour (721 km/h) and climb rate to over 4,500 ft/min (1,180 m/min) as opposed to the 2,900 ft/min (884 m/min) of the F4U-1A. The "4-Hog" retained the original armament and had all the external load (i.e., drop tanks, bombs) capabilities of the F4U-1D. The windscreen was now flat bullet-resistant glass to avoid optical distortion, a change from the curved Plexiglas windscreens with the internal plate glass of the earlier Corsairs. Vought also tested the two F4U-4Xs (BuNos 49763 and 50301, prototypes for the new R2800) with fixed wing-tip tanks (the Navy showed no interest) and an Aeroproducts six-blade contraprop (not accepted for production).

1/48 plastic kit from Hobby Boss, to build the Chance Vought F4U-1 Corsair (Late version), with decals for two US Navy versions.

Reviews

No customer reviews for the moment.

Write a review

1/48 Chance Vought F4U-1 Corsair (Late version)

1/48 Chance Vought F4U-1 Corsair (Late version)

1/48 plastic kit from Hobby Boss, to build the Chance Vought F4U-1 Corsair (Late version), with decals for two US Navy versions.

Accessories

30 other products in the same category: