LTV A-7P Corsair II

HOB87205

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1/72 Hobby Boss plastic kit to built the Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) A-7P Corsair II, in the colours of the Portuguese Air Force (FAP).

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0.8 kg
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Data sheet

BrandHobby Boss
Reference87205
SortPlastic kit
Scale1:72
Motifsubsonic light attack aircraft
Plastic parts188
Size196mm X 164,2mm
DecalsPortugal Air Force A-7P
Historical period1965-2014
AttentionDo not include paint or glue ( sold separately )
ContentPlastic kit | Decals | Instructions
Year2007

More info

The LTV A-7 Corsair II was a light attack aircraft based on the F-8 Crusader. The A-7 was one of the first combat aircraft to feature a head-up display (HUD). doppler-bounded inertial navigation system, and a turbofan engine.

In 1962, the United States Navy began preliminary work on VAX (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Experimental), a replacement for the A-4 Skyhawk with greater range and payload. Particular emphasis was placed on accurate delivery of weapons to reduce the cost per target. The requirements were finalized in 1963, announcing the VAL (Heavier-than-air, Attack, Light) competition.

To minimize costs, all proposals had to be based on existing designs. Vought, Douglas Aircraft, Grumman and North American Aviation responded. The Vought proposal was based on the successful Vought F-8 Crusader fighter, having a similar configuration, but shorter and more stubby, with a rounded nose. It was selected as the winner on 11 February 1964, and on 19 March the company received a contract for the initial batch of aircraft, designated A-7. In 1965, the aircraft received the popular name Corsair II, after Vought's highly successful Vought F4U Corsair of World War II (There was also a Vought O2U Corsair biplane scout and observation aircraft in the 1920s).
Compared to the F-8 fighter, the A-7 had a shorter, broader fuselage. The wing had a longer span, and the unique, variable incidence feature of the F-8 wing was omitted. To achieve the required range, the A-7 was powered by a Pratt & Whitney TF30-P-6 turbofan producing 11,345 lbf (50.5 kN) of thrust, the same innovative combat turbofan produced for the F-111 and early F-14 Tomcats, but without the afterburner needed for supersonic speeds.
The aircraft was fitted with an AN/APQ-116 radar, later followed by the AN/APQ-126, which was integrated into the ILAAS digital navigation system. The radar also fed a digital weapons computer which made possible accurate delivery of bombs from a greater stand-off distance, greatly improving survivability compared with faster platforms such as the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II. It was the first U.S. aircraft to have a modern head-up display, (made by Marconi-Elliott), now a standard instrument which displayed information such as dive angle, airspeed, altitude, drift and aiming reticle. The integrated navigation system allowed for another innovation – the projected map display system (PMDS) which accurately showed aircraft position on two different map scales.

The A-7 had a fast and smooth development. The YA-7A made its first flight on 27 September 1965, and began to enter Navy squadron service late in 1966. The first Navy A-7 squadrons reached operational status on 1 February 1967, and began combat operations over Vietnam in December of that year.

The A-7 offered a plethora of cutting-edge avionics compared to contemporary aircraft. This included data link capabilities that, among other features, provided fully "hands-off" carrier landing capability when used in conjunction with its approach power compensator (APC) or auto throttle. Other notable and highly advanced equipment was a projected map display located just below the radar scope. The map display was slaved to the inertial navigation system and provided a high-resolution map image of the aircraft's position superimposed over TPC/JNC charts. Moreover, when slaved to the all-axis auto pilot, the inertial navigation system could fly the aircraft "hands off" to up to nine individual waypoints. Typical inertial drift was minimal for newly manufactured models and the inertial measurement system accepted fly over, radar, and TACAN updates.

The A-7 family served with both the United States Navy and the United States Air Force, and later with the Air National Guard. It was also exported to South Vietnam (during the Vietnam War), Greece (A-7H), Portugal(A-7P), and Thailand (in the late 1980s).

From 1965 till 1984, the LTV built 1569 units of the A-7.

This is a 1/72 Hobby Boss plastic kit to built the Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) A-7P Corsair II, in the colours of the Portuguese Air Force (FAP).

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LTV A-7P Corsair II

LTV A-7P Corsair II

1/72 Hobby Boss plastic kit to built the Ling-Temco-Vought (LTV) A-7P Corsair II, in the colours of the Portuguese Air Force (FAP).

Portugal.jpg

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